1 Walpole, Horace. "An Account, by the Honourable Horace Walpole, of the Writings of John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester," Some Passages in the Life and Death of John Earl of Rochester, Gilbert Burnet. (London: W. Baynes and Son, 1820) 6
2 The Complete Poems of John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester, ed. David M. Vieth (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1968) xvii
3 For an excellent discussion of Rochesterís use of obscenity, please see Rogal, Samuel J. "Control of Honest Expression." Forum 30 (1989): 33-38.
4 Burnet 23
5 Greene 22
6 Vieth, Complete xviii
7 Greene 26
8 Greene 26
9 Greene 26
10 Burnet, 26
11 Burnet 27
12 Greene 67
13 Greene 86
14 Burnet 28
15 Greene 119
16 Greene 127
17 Greene 145
18 Greene 146
19 Vieth, Complete xii
20 Greene 152
21 Greene 208
22 Jones, JR, ed. The Restored Monarchy 1660-1688. (Totowa, NJ: Rowman & Littlefield: 1979). 11
23 Ibid. 11
24 Jones, JR Country and Court: England, 1658-1714. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard Univ. Press: 1978). 3
25 Weber, Harold. The Restoration Rake-Hero (Madison: Univ. of Wisconsin Press, 1986).
26 The Rochester-Saville Letters 1671-1680. Columbus: Ohio State Univ. Press, 1941. 46.
27 Vieth, David M, Attribution in Restoration Poetry: Rochesterís Poems of 1680 (New Haven: Yale Univ. Press: 1963)
28 Wilmot, John and Henry Saville. The Rochester-Saville Letters 1671-1680. (Columbus: The Ohio State University Press, 1841) 60.
29 Burnet, 39
30 Burnet, 37.
31 Griffin, Dustin H. Satires Against Man: The Poems of Rochester. (Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1973) 32.
32 According to Vieth (Complete, 42), "law students at the Inns of Court tried to achieve sophistication by becoming amateur literary critics." I would suggest that here, the emphasis should be laid on "tried."
33 Literally, a "foolish fire;" another name for a will-o-the-wisp.
34 For an excellent discussion of this, please see Vieth, Attribution in Restoration Poetry, pp. 275-278.
35 Pascal, Pensees. (Middlesex: Penguin, 1968) 47.
36 For example, see Griffin, pp. 168-73.
37 Cited in: Everett, Barbara. "The Sense of Nothing." Spirit of Wit: Reconsiderations of Rochester. Jeremy Treglown, Ed. 7-8.
38 Hobbes, Thomas. Leviathan. (New York: Collier Books, 1978). 100
39 Ibid, 100.
40 Ibid. 42, 59.
41 Rochesterís deathbed conversion is still debated today; while Burnet reports that Rochester rejected his former philosophies and attitudes and embraced the church, there is a possibility that the dying man was delirious, or had been pressured into it by sheer force of numbers Ė most of the people who saw him in his last months urged his conversion.
42 Lewis, Wyndham. "The Greatest Satire is Nonmoral," Satire: Modern Essays in Criticism. Ronald Paulson, Ed. (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall Inc, 1971) 175.