Tag Archives: Rated PG-13

VanHelsing

Originally written for The Milpitas Post Directed by: Steven Sommers Starring: Hugh Jackman, Kate Beckinsale, Richard Roxburgh, David Wenham, Shuler Hensley, Kevin J. O’Connor Rated: Rated PG-13 for nonstop creature action violence and frightening images, and for sensuality. Parental Notes: Although the monster action is indeed nonstop, this is an innocuous movie for teens and preteens. It’s not overly gross and although there’s sensuality, it’s not excessive.

Envy

Originally written for The Milpitas Post Directed by: Barry Levinson Starring: Ben Stiller, Jack Black, Rachel Weisz, Amy Poehler, Christopher Walken Rated: PG-13 for language and sexual/crude humor. Parental Notes: Teens will probably find this somewhat over-the-top tale of the infamous emotion and its effects amusing. It’s a bit raunchy for younger kids, but not terribly so.

Laws of Attraction

Originally Published In: The Milpitas Post Directed by: Peter Howitt Starring: Julianne Moore, Pierce Brosnan, Parker Posey, Michael Sheen Rated: PG-13 for sexual content and language. Parental Notes: This light romantic comedy is fine for teens but will probably bore youngsters.

Connie and Carla

Originally written for The Milpitas Post Directed by: Michael Lembeck Starring: Nia Vardalos, Toni Collette, David Duchovny, Stephen Spinella Rated: PG-13 for thematic elements, sexual humor and drug references. Parental Notes: Parents who aren’t worried about the subject matter (drag queens and mobsters) will find nothing to object to in this sweet, fluffy comedy.

Walking Tall

Originally written for The Milpitas Post Directed by: Kevin Bray Starring: The Rock, Johnny Knoxville, Neal McDonough, John Beasley, Barbara Tarbuck, Kristen Wilson Rated: PG-13 for sequences of intense violence, sexual content, drug material and language Parental Notes: This is a hard PG-13, much closer to an R. Teens will probably like it but some sequences, including one torture scene, may be too intense for preteens.

Hellboy

Originally written for The Milpitas Post Directed by: Guillermo del Toro Starring: Ron Perlman, Selma Blair, Karel Roden, Rupert Evans, John Hurt, Doug Jones Rated: PG-13 for sci-fi action violence and frightening images. Parental Notes: There’s plenty of violence here, but it’s comic-book style and mostly harmless for the teen and mature preteen set.

Starsky and Hutch

Directed by: Todd Phillips Starring: Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn, Juliette Lewis, Snoop Dog Rated: PG-13 for drug content, sexual situations, partial nudity, language and some violence. Parental Notes: most of the film is innocuous, and although teens may not get all the 70s references, they’ll probably find it amusing.

Against the Ropes

Directed by: Charles Dutton Starring: Meg Ryan, Omar Epps, Charles Dutton, Tony Shalhoub, Joe Cortese, Kerry Washington Rated: PG-13 for crude language, violence, brief sensuality and some drug material. Parental Notes: Although the boxing sequences in this picture may be a bit intense for some youngsters, this film should be fine for most preteens. It also provides a positive female role model, one who learns from her mistakes and isn’t too proud to say she’s sorry.

The Perfect Score

Directed by: Brian Robbins Starring: Erika Christensen, Chris Evans, Bryan Greenberg, Scarlett Johansson, Darius Miles, Leonardo Nam Rated: PG-13 (for language, sexual content, and some drug references) Parental Notes: Although some parents may worry about the central premise of the film – stealing the answers to the SAT – this is an innocuous teen flick. There is some sexual innuendo and a bit of foul language, but nothing overly objectionable for the teen or pre-teen set. Indeed, this might serve as a good springboard for discussion about standardized testing and its fairness.

The Perfect Score

Directed by: Brian Robbins Starring: Erika Christensen, Chris Evans, Bryan Greenberg, Scarlett Johansson, Darius Miles, Leonardo Nam Rated: PG-13 (for language, sexual content, and some drug references) Parental Notes: Although some parents may worry about the central premise of the film – stealing the answers to the SAT – this is an innocuous teen flick. There is some sexual innuendo and a bit of foul language, but nothing overly objectionable for the teen or pre-teen set. Indeed, this might serve as a good springboard for discussion about standardized testing and its fairness.